BREAKING: High Ranking Congresswoman Found Dead In D.C. After LONG Fight On Capitol Hill

When many politicians got involved in a career on Capitol Hill they probably didn’t think that it was a job that should come with hazard pay. The political game is more vicious than ever from the left now that we have a non-career politician as a president who has been draining the swamp since day one in office. President Donald Trump makes no apologies for exposing the corruption in Washington, D.C. and making America better for it. However, that’s causing the entire establishment to panic, which often has devolved into desperate measures which there’s been no shortage of in the past 14 months.

There have been a lot of sudden and strange deaths reported among people involved in politics recently. While some have mysteriously slipped out of the mainstream news media coverage, others have not. The long fight on Capitol Hill that high ranking Congresswoman Louise Slaughter was most known for has now come to an end with her sudden death. What led to her passing is rather ironic considering what else happened the very same day she died.

Regardless of political affiliation or opinion, it’s tragic when anyone passes away and that’s no different for Slaughter, even though she had a progressive mission as a Congresswoman. This news is especially devastating for Democrats and certain notable liberals who relied on her to help execute their agenda, which she fought long and hard for during her career. Slaughter fell short of her goal which had already been compromised under President Trump who didn’t support what she stood for.

Congresswoman Louise Slaughter, 88

The Democrat & Chronicle reported on her shocking passing: On Capitol Hill, she was known as an energetic leader of the Democratic Party and a passionate champion for progressive issues. In Rochester, most of her constituents knew her simply as Louise.

Rep. Louise Slaughter, a Democrat who represented the Rochester area in Congress since 1987, died Friday morning in a Washington, D.C., hospital. She was 88.

The report also noted that Slaughter had suffered a fall in her Washington residence last week, causing injuries which ultimately led to her death just a few days later. The Congresswoman died the same day that Hillary Clinton had a second fall within a week while in India that required a hospital stay. While Hillary just fractured her wrist in her second fall in which she tumbled into the bathtub in her hotel room, Slaughter tragically couldn’t recover from her injuries. Perhaps this is the same path that Hillary is on which could be the cause of her ultimate demise.

What’s important to note is that Slaughter was admired by people on both sides of the aisle for her ability to be respectful to her opponents despite their difference in opinions. This is what’s missing from most younger liberal politicians who resort to name calling and even violence to get their way or their point across. Slaughter was an example that politics doesn’t have to ruin a person.

Speaking favorably of his opponent in her passing for the incredibly respectable representative she was, Republican Mark Assini, a Gates Town Supervisor who had challenged Slaughter in two elections, said her Southern drawl was disarming.

“People were surprised at the genuine affection we had for one another and the respect and the politeness,” Assini said. “Losing to her was no shame. She was beloved. She was beloved for a reason. It wasn’t because she was a good politician. She was a good person. … She cared about people and she was pretty candid about things.”

As a Kentucky native, it was Slaughter’s sweet southern accent that she was most known for, having never lost it even years after moving from her home state. She reportedly used it to charm constituents and colleagues alike with a folksy manner, rather than a negative approach of attack that we see so often now from other Democrats on Capitol Hill.

Democrat & Chronicle continued: Flags at the U.S. Capitol building were lowered to half-staff Friday morning, and condolences poured in from nearly every major American political figure.

“Louise was a giant in the people’s House,” said Speaker Paul Ryan (R-WI). “She was unrelenting in fighting for her ideas and the people back home in Western New York. But really the thing that I keep coming back to is that she was tough but unfailingly gracious.”

Senate Minority Leader Charles Schumer, D-NY, called her “a giant.”

“She had deep convictions — on both issues important to the people of Rochester, and for the integrity and honesty of the political system,” Schumer said. “The ferocity of her advocacy was matched only by the depth of her compassion and humanity. Her passing will leave a gaping hole in our hearts and our nation.”

Despite her progressive political mission on Capitol Hill, her approach to fighting for what was important to her is something that all liberals in Congress can and should learn from. She will certainly be missed as will her southern drawl that captivated the hearts of all in Congress.

 

 

source:https://daily-vine.com

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